July Friends of UA

in

 

 

Dear Friend of UA, Last month I shared some of the exciting ways that the University of Arizona continues to impact our state and world, even with the advent of the summer heat and the temporary drop in our campus population. This work continues as we prepare for the rapidly approaching 2015-2016 school year.

July 24, 2015

 
 

 

Dear Friend of UA,

 

Last month I shared some of the exciting ways that the University of Arizona continues to impact our state and world, even with the advent of the summer heat and the temporary drop in our campus population. This work continues as we prepare for the rapidly approaching 2015-2016 school year.

 

With last month’s Friends of UA focused largely on student engagement and community partnership, this month I would like to share several examples of ways that UA researchers are working with partners to create important impact here in Arizona. This month’s insert details several examples of ways that as we continue to find novel applications for research programs ranging from dendrochronology (the study of tree rings) to poison control and skin cancer treatment.

 

The impact of UA research also extends globally. As I shared last month with the launch of the new collaborative venture between the UA and the National Autonomous University of Mexico, we have a great number of important partnerships developing this summer. One particularly exciting one, which I mentioned briefly in June, is the UA’s work with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). This partnership currently revolves largely around the collaboration that Dr. Dante Lauretta – principal investigator for the OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission – has with JAXA and its similar Hayabusa 2 mission.

 

The UA's Dante Lauretta, OSIRIS-REx principal investigator, gives a presentation to more than 200 members of the public at the TenQ Space Museum in Tokyo, explaining the collaborative efforts between the OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa 2 asteroid sample return missions.

The UA's Dante Lauretta, OSIRIS-REx principal investigator, gives a presentation to more than 200 members of the public at the TenQ Space Museum in Tokyo, explaining the collaborative efforts between the OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa 2 asteroid sample return missions.

 

This collaboration is an important opportunity for the UA to continue building its international partnerships in space sciences; just last week I returned from a nearly two-week visit to Tokyo, Hiroshima, and Kyoto with this goal in mind. Members of the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR), ABOR President Eileen Klein, UA leadership, and I met with several leaders of JAXA to discuss the collaborations between that agency and the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, as well as the Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory. Our meetings were a wonderful opportunity to create a deeper understanding of each other’s institutions, and to define potential areas of partnership moving ahead.

 

During the trip, I also toured the Hiroshima Peace Park, and met with survivors of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. This was a sobering experience, and, as a backdrop for the meetings with JAXA earlier in the week, the visit highlighted the need for the UA and other research universities to lead efforts for cross-cultural understanding and peaceful collaboration through critical inquiry and creative expression as well as scientific exploration. Returning home to a vibrant campus, I am grateful for the many ways that UA faculty and students are pursuing this aspect of our mission, and I look forward with great anticipation to the beginning of the academic year as these and other efforts bear fruit.

 

Thank you for your continued support. I will be in touch with another Friends of UA and the return of regular blog posts in August.

 

Sincerely,

 

Ann Weaver Hart
President
University of Arizona

 

 

 
 

 

If you have questions or comments about this email, please send them to president@email.arizona.edu

Copyright 2015 © Arizona Board of Regents

This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
The University of Arizona · 1401 E University Blvd · P.O. Box 210066 · Tucson, AZ 85721-0066 · USA